Rootstrap Blog

Tag: rails

Total 22 Posts

Rails N + 2 queries

We usually try to solve performance problems by using #includes to get rid of N + 1 queries but this doesn’t always fix the issue; in fact, it can even create more queries under some circumstances. This post shows a few examples of when that happens and how to deal with it.

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How to Improve Maintainability in Rails Applications Using Patterns. Part I

Introduction Software is constantly evolving, both in specification and implementation. Keeping an extensible and maintainable codebase is therefore crucial in order to deal with these changes quickly and easily. Ruby on Rails comes with a lot of good techniques and patterns out of the box that facilitate this. Nevertheless, some

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Payment platforms for mobile apps

It’s common these days to see apps that offer to sell you in-app content on your mobile device. Sometimes they only sell virtual things like coins, diamonds, and credits that give users access to certain functionalities. But on a lot of e-commerce apps, like Amazon, you can buy physical goods. Both types of apps have platforms that manage payments. And there are many payment platform options to choose from. This article lists some of them, along with their pros and cons.

You can’t always use the payment platform you want. You might want to sell virtual or digital goods on your app like coins and credits, but you don’t provide another way to do that like a web page. In this case, you must use in-app purchases to be approved by Apple. But if you run an e-commerce page where you sell solid goods like clothes, you can use other payment methods.

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Ruby doesn’t scale

Why you should stop blaming a programming language for your low quality work.

I’ve heard too many times that Ruby on Rails (also called RoR) doesn’t scale. Guess what? Java doesn’t scale, .NET doesn’t scale, PHP doesn’t scale, and Node.js doesn’t scale. No programming language scales if you build terrible software with it.

In this article, I focus on Ruby, but the information is valid for almost any programming language. If you typically benchmark Ruby against other languages like Python or C++, it’s probably slower in most contexts.

The real question is not how long it takes or how many resources it consumes to run some algorithms like regex redux, binary tree searches, or reading DNA sequences.

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